4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
© Crystal Cox/Business Insider the US Food and Drug Administration stopped requiring sellers to label the daily value of vitamin C and vitamin A on nutrition labels because “deficiencies of these vitamins are rare today.” Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Vitamins A, C, B and zinc are nutrients that Americans typically get enough of through their diet.
  • Nutrition experts said Americans should try to get all nutrients from food rather than through supplements.
  • Taking additional vitamin C and zinc will likely not prevent a cold, and excess amounts get peed out.

4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
1/5 SLIDES © Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group/Los Angeles Daily News/Getty Images

4 ways Americans will get hammered with benefit cuts once COVID-19 is no longer deemed an official public health emergency

The federal government renewed a public health emergency declaration earlier this month. It paves the way for extra federal assistance on food stamps, COVID-19 vaccines, and testing. But unwinding it could spell benefit cuts for many people — here’s how.

Millions of Americans could soon be dealing with cuts to federal benefits in just a few months.

The Department of Health and Human Services extended the COVID-19 public health emergency declaration earlier this month. The 90-day designation was renewed on April 12, setting up a mid-July expiration unless the Biden administration decides to continue it.

That emergency declaration opens the door to increased federal funding for a variety of programs, ranging from improved access to Medicaid to more generous food benefits. But if the declaration lapses, that extra funding could vanish.

“Prematurely declaring an end to the public health emergency hampers the response to COVID-19,” Larry Levitt, a health policy expert at the Kaiser Family Foundation, wrote on Twitter.

The Biden administration has assured states they will receive 60 days of advance notice before the public health emergency ends. Yet the pandemic is ongoing and while new recorded cases remain far below their winter peak, they’re ticking upward once again after an early springtime lull.

Here are four ways that Americans could get hammered with abrupt ends to more generous health and nutritional benefits.

Read the original article on Insider

4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
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Extra food assistance from the federal government will expire.

The declaration paves the way for the federal government to provide more assistance through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps.

Eligible families get at least an extra $95 per month in federal aid as a result of the public health emergency, per the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Once that ends, most SNAP recipients are poised to lose $82 per month in benefits, according to the Food Research and Action Center.

Not everyone is accessing this aid. Some GOP-led states like Florida and Missouri pulled the plug on their beefed-up nutritional assistance programs last year. At least five more that are also GOP-controlled intend to cut the aid next month since they ended their state public health emergency declarations, The New Republic reported.

The Department of Agriculture will give states one month to transition beneficiaries off the enhanced assistance once the federal government ends the designation.

4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
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Around 15 million Americans could lose Medicaid coverage.

Millions of low-income Americans will also lose access to free health insurance through Medicaid since the federal government will no longer be picking up the tab for states.

The federal government and states share responsibility in financing Medicaid. An earlier pandemic relief law in March 2020 expanded the federal government’s share of payments for the duration of the public health emergency.

Estimates on the extent of coverage losses once the emergency ends vary. But the Urban Institute projected in late 2021 up to 15 million Americans will lose their Medicaid health insurance over 14 months.

A recent analysis from the left-leaning Center on American Progress warned of financial strains on hospitals dealing with a spike in uninsured patients, along with people delaying medical care since they cannot afford it.

The report also warned that the policy’s end would have an outsized impact on low-income Black and Latino people. Those two groups are twice as likely to be enrolled in Medicaid compared to non-Hispanic Whites — and they have suffered greater hospitalization and death rates from COVID-19.

4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
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COVID-19 shots won’t be free.

Free COVID-19 shots won’t be as available as they used to be.

The public health emergency designation widened eligibility for free coronavirus vaccines under Medicaid.

But that will change for people without health insurance, since they will have start footing the bill for some shots, per the Kaiser Family Foundation.

However, those with private insurance will likely be okay. Under changes enacted through the CARES Act in March 2020, insurers must provide access to vaccines at no cost to their beneficiaries since they are now considered preventive care.

4 useless supplements you're likely already getting enough of through your diet, according to nutrition experts
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The supplement industry is exploding, but nutrition experts don’t recommend getting your vitamins and minerals from pills.

Supplement sales reached a record-breaking $55 billion in sales in 2020, and the industry has recorded huge gains since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Emma Laing, a clinical professor at the University of Georgia and a registered dietitian, said most healthy adults get their nutrients through food rather than supplements, as food offers biochemicals and fiber that don’t come from a pill.

“Foods like whole grains, vegetables, and legumes are generally considered affordable foods that are also nutrient-rich,” Laing told Insider. “It would be difficult to manufacture a supplement that would mimic the exact nutrient profile of these foods and yield the same health benefits.”

Plus, Americans may not realize they are getting enough vitamins and minerals through their diet already. Insider spoke with three dietitians to understand which vitamins and minerals Americans are typically eating enough of through their diet, making supplements unnecessary.

Though Americans typically get enough vitamins A, C, B and zinc through the Western diet, experts said people should strive to get every nutrient through a balanced diet. People with deficiencies diagnosed by a doctor, or those who have limited diets due to food allergy or intolerance, could require supplements, per Laing.

Vitamin C supplements might reduce the severity or length of a cold, but overtaking supplements won’t help

In 2018, the US Food and Drug Administration stopped requiring sellers to label the daily value of vitamin C and vitamin A on nutrition labels because of how rare deficiencies of these vitamins are. The two nutrients are found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, and it doesn’t take much to get your daily requirement: just one orange has most vitamin C you need for the day, per Medical News Today.

Because of vitamin C’s immune boosting properties, some people take the supplement to prevent colds. Kirstin Vollrath, a registered dietitian and professor at the University of Houston, said taking vitamin C and zinc together at the start of a cold might reduce its symptoms or length, but won’t stop the virus. A 2013 review of placebo-controlled trials did not find evidence vitamin C supplementation prevents colds.

“Our bodies are much more sophisticated than we give them credit for,” Vollrath said. “Your body knows how much vitamin C it needs, and once it’s got enough to be able to function, the rest of it is going to be excreted mostly through urine.”

Most Americans are getting enough vitamin A — but supplements are causing overdoses

Like with vitamin C, the FDA stopped requiring food manufacturers to label the daily percentage of vitamin A due to the rarity of deficiencies.

Vollrath said though globally vitamin A deficiency is a common cause for blindness, the average Western diet contains enough of the nutrient.

In fact, Vollrath said Americans are more likely to over do it on vitamin A. Vitamin A toxicity occurs usually when taking too many supplements and can cause nausea, headaches, and blurred vision.

“When people think about vitamins, it’s never more is better,” Vollrath said. “We always need enough, and sometimes more is harmful.”

Typical American diets contain enough vitamin B, excluding B12

There are several different types of vitamin B, including thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), and cobalamin (B12). Vitamin B helps convert food into energy, boosts immunity, and assists in making new cells, according to Harvard Medical School.

Michelle Averill, the associate director of the University of Washington’s Graduate Coordinated Program in Dietetics, said generally Americans are “doing fine” with getting enough vitamin B, particularly if they are eating grains fortified with the nutrient. Averill said research has indicated there is “very little benefit” from taking vitamin B supplements.

Vitamin B12 is a different story, Averill said, as vegetarians and vegans might not get enough of the nutrient since it’s found primarily in animal products. Vitamin B12 deficiencies can cause anemia, sensory problems, and nerve damage.

Adults typically get enough zinc, and taking the mineral won’t stop a cold

Averill said young kids can benefit from getting more zinc, but the deficiencies of the mineral should not concern most adults.

“We’re not really that deficient in it,” Averill said. “There’s very little evidence to suggest that you could take it and prevent things.

She said many people have tried taking zinc supplements to prevent or minimize a cold. A recent analysis of 28 controlled trials found zinc had a moderate to no effect on easing the symptoms of a cold, though it can shorten the duration of symptoms.

But according to Averill, zinc has to be in the body before exposure to the virus to have the best results. Plus, taking zinc supplements through nasal sprays can lead to permanent loss of smell, according to Mayo Clinic.

Some populations may still require supplements for health

Though most healthy Americans wouldn’t benefit from supplements like vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B, and zinc, Laing said there are groups of people who may require it. The groups include people with a deficiency diagnosed by a doctor, those with limited diets due to food allergy or intolerance, infants, and people planning for pregnancy or who are pregnant. Certain health conditions and medicines may require supplementation as well, according to Laing.

Read the original article on Insider

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