Isabelle Cormier spent the days after post-tropical storm Fiona picking through what could be salvaged of her family’s 40-year-old cottage.

Among the soggy treasures strewn on the ground: a troll doll, so old its hair was gone, a large cooking pot, and a single oar — a fitting souvenir for a family that loves boating.

The cottage, hand-built by the family using driftwood, collapsed like a house of cards during the storm.

All that remains is the roof, a window covered in children’s stickers and a limp electric wire, waving in the wind.

“A good friend of mine called me early in the morning, Saturday morning, and said ‘I’m so sorry,'” said Cormier.

But she had known the day was coming when the building would collapse. It was long protected by a sand dune so high that people inside the could only see the water from the top floor.

Over the last three years, storms — including 2019’s Dorian — winnowed that sand dune down to nothing. By the time Fiona hit, the cottage was fully exposed to the elements.

“My grieving, I did it when Dorian hit. I knew that was going to be it,” she said. “It’s emotional now … because it’s a place for us, for our family, and it’s got a great deal of soul.”

After 3rd major storm in 5 years, Magdalen Islanders say they're on 'front line' of climate change

On Sunday, members of Isabelle Cormier’s family cleaned up the wreckage of her cottage, including picking up personal items (such as this troll doll) from the ground.

Shoreline loss now half-metre a year

Fiona is the third major storm to hit the Magdalen Islands in five years, according to Serge Bourgeois, the director of urban planning for the municipality, which has a population of about 12,000. (Another 465 people live in Grosse Îsle, a mostly English-speaking island which is a separate municipality.)

Quebec’s Transport Ministry is still doing repairs after Hurricane Dorian, Bourgeois said.

Storms are speeding up erosion but even without major weather events, research from the Université du Québec à Rimouski (UQAR) shows that the Magdalen Islands are losing land mass faster than they did before.

One study shows that between 1963 and 2008, the islands’ shorelines eroded an average of 24 centimetres per year. More recent UQAR studies have found that loss has nearly doubled since 2005, to 46 centimetres — or nearly half a metre — per year.

The sand and dunes, described by Cormier as the islands’ “flesh and blood,” are vanishing at an alarming rate, she said.

“Us islanders are on the front line of the climate change,” said Cormier. “The real impact, the real grieving, it’s the erosion.”

Fight to save the Maggies

Since 2018, the three levels of government have spent more than $50 million to fight shoreline erosion on the Magdalen Islands.

Visiting the islands in the storm’s aftermath on Monday, Coalition Avenir Québec Leader François Legault promised an additional $100 million and the creation of an office to co-ordinate efforts to stall erosion on all affected shorelines, including on the Gaspé Peninsula and along the Lower North Shore.

“It’s a step in the right direction,” said Bourgeois. “The 100 million dollars is one thing, but the office is an excellent idea.”

After 3rd major storm in 5 years, Magdalen Islanders say they're on 'front line' of climate change

Nouane Giguère, owner of L’Anse aux Herbes in La Grave, said her store experienced about a foot of flooding during post-tropical storm Fiona.

Recent efforts to prevent erosion have already made some difference, locals say.

In La Grave, on the southern side of the archipelago, the province and the municipality shared the $7.4 million cost of fortifying the pebble beach ahead of more storms.

Small seaside stores flooded. However, the owner of one of them, called Anse aux Herbes, said things could have been much worse.

“What we are really happy about is they put down the rocks to break the waves, and that was helpful,” said Nouane Giguère, who spent Sunday cleaning and assessing damage after her store took on about a foot of water.

“Without it, it would be really, really more dramatic.”

But with the latest evidence of just how much damage one ferocious storm can wreak, many islanders hope political leaders can now see the urgency of the situation and just what it will take to save their foothold in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

After 3rd major storm in 5 years, Magdalen Islanders say they're on 'front line' of climate change

Post-tropical storm Fiona ended around 10 p.m. Saturday on the Magdalen Islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with winds surpassing 150 km/h times.

NEWS RELATED

Alleged serial killer’s estranged wife says she is overwhelmed by survivor’s guilt: ‘Why did I get to survive’

Erin Leszkovics couldn’t hold back tears while reliving some of the pain and abuse she says she’s endured over the years. The estranged wife of an alleged serial killer is grappling with her emotions and says she is overcome with extreme guilt after hearing her ex is now charged ...

View more: Alleged serial killer’s estranged wife says she is overwhelmed by survivor’s guilt: ‘Why did I get to survive’

Pak fundamentalists lock Gurdwara Shaheed Bhai Taru Singh, calls it a 'mosque'

Pak fundamentalists lock Gurdwara Shaheed Bhai Taru Singh, calls it a ‘mosque’ Pakistan’s Evacuee Trust Property Board (ETPB) has closed Gurdwara Shaheed Bhai Taru Singh, located in Lahore, for worship, claiming that it is a mosque. Pakistan’s ETPB along with some fundamentalists has put a lock on the Gurudwara ...

View more: Pak fundamentalists lock Gurdwara Shaheed Bhai Taru Singh, calls it a 'mosque'

Supreme Court of B.C. overturns $60,000 fine issued to Whistler woman for feeding bears

A black bear goes through garbage in this photo taken during by a B.C. Conservation Service officer responding to a call in Whistler in 2014. A Supreme Court of B.C. judge has ruled a $60,000 penalty levied against a Whistler woman for feeding bears was excessive. According to a ...

View more: Supreme Court of B.C. overturns $60,000 fine issued to Whistler woman for feeding bears

Kate Winslet And Cameron Diaz In ‘The Holiday’ Sequel? Director Nancy Meyers Says ‘Not True’

Jude Law, Cameron Diaz in “The Holiday”. Director Nancy Meyers has responded to rumours that a sequel to “The Holiday” is on its way. The beloved 2006 flick saw Kate Winslet’s Iris and Cameron Diaz’s Amanda swap houses. Winslet’s character ended up dating Jack Black’s Miles after they met ...

View more: Kate Winslet And Cameron Diaz In ‘The Holiday’ Sequel? Director Nancy Meyers Says ‘Not True’

Eruption of Indonesian volcano caught on satellite, webcams

JAKARTA, Indonesia – Nearly one year since a deadly eruption devastated communities on Indonesia’s populous Java island, Mount Semeru erupted again, sending ash miles into the sky and forcing residents to seek shelter. Mount Semeru in Indonesia The eruption started Sunday, and cameras captured the moments gas and ash were ...

View more: Eruption of Indonesian volcano caught on satellite, webcams

Mosaic temporarily curtails potash production at Canadian mine

By Rod Nickel WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) – Fertilizer producer Mosaic Co said on Tuesday that it has temporarily curtailed potash production at its Colonsay, Saskatchewan, mine in Canada, citing slower-than-expected demand. Mosaic said in a statement that its inventories are adequate to meet demand in the short term. The company ...

View more: Mosaic temporarily curtails potash production at Canadian mine

Vancouver OKs capital budget, including Aquatic Centre renovations

Vancouver Aquatic Centre in Vancouver, B.C., June 27, 2022. Vancouver council approved a $730 million capital budget Tuesday for 2023, but put off a decision about the operating budget — which includes major items such as policing — until next year. The 2023 capital budget is the first step ...

View more: Vancouver OKs capital budget, including Aquatic Centre renovations

Bad Witch Bakery to close; owner says small businesses need more support

After years of being in survival mode, a local bakery owner is closing up shop and calling for more to be done to support small businesses in Windsor. Gabby Jedlinski, the owner-operator and head baker of Bad Witch Bakery, said it was a painful decision to shut her doors, but between the pandemic, ...

View more: Bad Witch Bakery to close; owner says small businesses need more support

2 Dividend Stocks That Could Lead a 2023 Rally

Tay snowmobilers get ‘400-series’ upgrade through Trillium grant

New York City Mayor Eric Adams appoints first Black woman to serve as first deputy mayor

Christina Hall and Ant Anstead Settle Custody Battle and Will No Longer Go to Trial

Extreme cold warnings issued for all of southern, central Manitoba

A bat infestation at a Nevada fire station is so bad, the department is abandoning the building

World Cup Viewer's Guide: 2 quarterfinals places left

49ers get surprising news on Jimmy Garoppolo's foot injury

Gignac returns to Windsor Police Services Board

School boards look to reduce large gatherings amid high rates of illness

‘I don’t know how to stop Messi!’ - De Jong has no secret World Cup plan to help the Netherlands

Paralyzed Dog Rescued After Being Found on Train Tracks in Philadelphia: 'This Is Pure Evil'

OTHER NEWS

Breaking thailand news, thai news, thailand news Verified News Story Network