lee c. bollinger

Lee C. Bollinger became Columbia University’s 19th president in 2002 and is the longest serving Ivy League president. President Bollinger is Columbia’s first Seth Low Professor of the University, a member of the Columbia Law School faculty, and one of the nation’s foremost First Amendment scholars. Each fall semester, he teaches “Freedom of Speech and Press” to Columbia undergraduate students. His latest books are Social Media, Freedom of Speech, and the Future of our Democracy and National Security, Leaks and Freedom of the Press: The Pentagon Papers Fifty Years On, both co-edited with Geoffrey R. Stone.

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Reusable Contact Lenses More Than Triple Risk of Rare Preventable Eye Infection

Summary: People who use reusable contact lenses rather than disposable daily lenses are four times more likely to develop Acanthamoeba keratitis, a corneal infection that can cause sight loss. Source: UCL People who wear reusable contact lenses are nearly four times as likely as those wearing daily disposables to develop ...

View more: Reusable Contact Lenses More Than Triple Risk of Rare Preventable Eye Infection

A Potential New Treatment for Brain Tumors

Summary: Researchers study the effect of letrozole , a drug designed for the treatment of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, on glioblastoma brain cancer. Source: University of Cincinnati A research question posed in Pankaj Desai’s lab has led to a decade of research, a clinical trial and major national funding ...

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Why Our Brain Wiring’s Insulation Matters

Summary: Myelin is more complex and dynamic than previously believed. Source: University of Oxford Alberto Lazari of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences explains the importance of insulation in our brains’ wiring. Our brains contain a striking amount of ‘brain wires’, which allow electrical signals to send important information from one corner of ...

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New Research Throws Doubt on Old Ideas of How Hearing Works

Summary: A new study casts old theories about hearing into doubt. Researchers found many cells in the inner ear react simultaneously to low-frequency sounds. This makes it easier for us to hear low-frequency sounds as the brain is able to receive input from many sensory cells at the same time. ...

View more: New Research Throws Doubt on Old Ideas of How Hearing Works

JWST’s MIRI Issues, Newborn Quasar, Detecting Exoplanets with Lagrange Points

James Webb is currently experiencing problems with its MIRI instrument. The problem is due to increased friction in one of MIRI’s mechanisms in the Medium-Resolution Spectroscopy (MRS) mode. The observatory is otherwise healthy, but the team decided to stop observations using MRS mode until they find a solution. A ...

View more: JWST’s MIRI Issues, Newborn Quasar, Detecting Exoplanets with Lagrange Points

8 Myths About Alcohol That Your Liver Will Thank You For Not Believing

Sometimes ignorance is bliss. But blissful ignorance can bring about unnecessary suffering when it comes to drinking. Time to get your facts straight before you end up on the bathroom floor again. Myth #1 – Eating before drinking keeps you sober No matter how much you eat — or ...

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50 years ago, an artist convincingly exhibited a fake Iron Age civilization

Invented civilizations are usually thought of as the stuff of sci-fi novels and video games, not museums. Yet in 1972, the Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art at Cornell University exhibited “The Civilization of Llhuros,” an imaginary Iron Age civilization. Created by Cornell Professor of Art Norman Daly, who ...

View more: 50 years ago, an artist convincingly exhibited a fake Iron Age civilization

Meet Orbit, the Interactive Robot That Looks to Help Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Develop Social Skills

Summary: Orbit, an interactive robot, helps teach children on the autism spectrum to develop social appropriateness and emotion via storytelling, physical interaction, and visual communication. Source: Loughborough University “Hey there. Allow me to introduce you to your new companion, Orbit, a robot you can play with and listen to. Not ...

View more: Meet Orbit, the Interactive Robot That Looks to Help Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Develop Social Skills

Storm Fiona slams into east Canada, major power outages

NASA scraps Tuesday Moon launch due to storm

The Moon’s Poles Have “Wandered” Over Billions of Years

NASA cancels Artemis I launch attempt, but will delay roll back decision

Researchers Develop a Better, Less Toxic Type of Rice

NASA calls off Artemis 1 moon rocket launch on Sept. 27 due to Tropical Storm Ian

Americans are becoming more likely to cooperate with strangers, not less

NASA Waves Off Upcoming Artemis I Moon Rocket Launch, Prepares for Rollback

You can see Jupiter without a telescope this month

After destruction, Florida Air Force base rebuilds to face effects of climate change 

Surprising Findings: Bacteria Punish Cheaters and Enforce Fairness Within Their Communities

Music on the brain: Listening can influence our brain’s activity

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