Province says plans moving ahead for alternate Calgary safe consumption site; opioid deaths continue to drop

Mike Ellis, associate minister of mental health and addictions on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022.

The number of opioid-related deaths in Alberta continued to fall last July, as work to establish a new supervised safe consumption site moves ahead, provincial officials said Thursday.

Alberta Health said 92 Albertans died from opioid overdoses in July , down 47 per cent from the peak number of fatalities — 174 — recorded in November of last year.

That number has continued to drop almost every month since February, when 168 people in the province died from opioid overdoses, the vast majority of those involving fentanyl.

In Calgary, the fatal toll fell from a high of 62 reached last February to 29 in July.

Opioid-related EMS calls also fell by 39 per cent last July from the same month in 2021.

While fatalities remain a concern, that downward trend is a cause for optimism and a sign the province’s strategy in attacking the epidemic is working and needs to be pressed forward, said Mike Ellis, associate minister of mental health and addictions.

“Now is the time to redouble our efforts to make it as easy as possible for Albertans to pursue recovery from addiction,” he said in a statement.

“We will continue working tirelessly to address the addiction crisis, reduce deaths even further, and make treatment and recovery as accessible as possible.”

A physician who works with vulnerable populations in Calgary noted the fatality numbers are almost down to pre-pandemic levels and reflect the receding COVID-19 reality.

During the pandemic with its more restricted borders, it was harder to smuggle in, leading traffickers to sell dangerously adulterated drugs, said Dr. Monty Ghosh.

“The toxic drug supply now is probably not as bad as it was before,” he said.

Drug users are now less dangerously isolated and improved access to agonist, or drug replacement treatment has also helped, as have other government programs, said Ghosh.

Province says plans moving ahead for alternate Calgary safe consumption site; opioid deaths continue to drop

Dr. Monty Ghosh outside the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre.

But on the same day, Ellis also expressed dismay that another Calgary homeless shelter — this time the Alpha House Society — appeared to be delaying establishing an alternative supervised consumption site there.

“Today I became aware Alpha House has decided to put their plans to open an overdose prevention site at their Calgary shelter on hold … this decision was made without the input of Alberta’s government,” Ellis tweeted Thursday.

That tweet was deleted later in the day after it was determined there’d been a miscommunication, said a spokesman for Ellis’s office.

The proposal is still moving ahead, said Ellis’s office.

Earlier this month, a proposal to relocate the Safeworks site at the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre to the Calgary Drop-In Centre in the East Village was cancelled following a lack of support from residents who said they’d welcome some programs but wanted overdose prevention spread around the city.

A spokeswoman for the Alpha House Society didn’t return calls for comment Thursday but on Sept. 9, a society representative said they’d be consulting with the community about the proposal.

“We look forward to ongoing discussions about this topic as we consider the real and pressing need for these services amidst the drug crisis in our province and how, as a city, we can create safe and inclusive communities for everyone,” Shaundra Bruvall said in an email.

That effort follows an announcement last year that the facility at the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre in the city’s Beltline would close. It remains open for now.

In making that decision, the province was responding to complaints of social disorder related to the Safeworks site at the Sheldon Chumir.

Last year, the province said Safeworks would be replaced by two smaller sites at more appropriate locations.

Related

In the meantime, the provincial government said the receding number of opioid deaths in the province was a result of its multi-pronged approach to combating the opioid crisis.

Its establishment of 8,000 treatment and detox beds , a digital overdose response system and the introduction of the treatment drug Sublocade have helped turn the tide, they said.

“The Alberta model is community-based and focused on increasing access to a co-ordinated network of services, including prevention, early intervention, harm reduction, treatment and recovery supports,” Ellis’s ministry said in a statement.

But critics of the government’s approach have said officials should be more open to providing a safer supply of drugs — as is the case in B.C. — and have dragged their feet on harm reduction embodied in supervised consumption sites.

Ghosh said a recent study in Ontario showing the merits of safe supply in lowering hospital and emergency room admissions shows the policy could hold promise.

“There could be benefits from a safe supply but it’s still not risk-free — there’s the possibility it could get sold, redistributed and inappropriately used,” he said.

And Ghosh, who’s worked on the opioid crisis at the Drop-In Centre, said it’s important there be safe consumption sites both there and at the Alpha House and that the neighbouring community buys into it.

“We’d see less overdoses on the street, that’s already happening … (area residents) have to understand things will improve overall,” he said.

— With files from Dylan Short

BKaufmann@postmedia.com

Twitter: @BillKaufmannjrn

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