Study shows prestigious institutions produce more published manuscripts because they have a bigger labor pool
Impact of available labor on group size and group productivity.(A) Coefficients of standardized departmental covariates for predicting annual average total productivity, group productivity, and group size, divided into groups of disciplines with and without collaboration norms (see the Supplementary Materials). Bars indicate 95% confidence intervals, and filled-in circles indicate statistically significant coefficients at the 0.05 level. Funded labor is significant and highly predictive of all dependent variables, even after controlling for prestige, in disciplines with collaboration norms. (B) For matched pairs of faculty, mean group size in the 3 years before and after moving to a location with more (dashed orange) or less (solid black) available funded labor than their pre-move location. Error bars indicate 1 SE. (C) Mean cumulative number of group members over a faculty career as a function of cumulative group productivity, for faculty at the least prestigious (solid black) or most prestigious (dashed orange) half of institutions in their discipline, showing a nearly identical size-productivity relationship. Envelopes indicate 95% confidence intervals around the means. Credit: Science Advances (2022). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abq7056

A quartet of researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has found that the reason more prestigious universities are able to publish more scientific papers than lesser institutions is that they have a larger pool of undergrads, fellows and postdocs to assist with such efforts.

In their paper, published in the journal Science Advances, Sam Zhang, Hunter Wapman, Daniel Larremore and Aaron Clauset describe analyzing massive amounts of data in the Web of Science database to learn more about publishing by institutions in the U.S.

Most of the prestigious science paper publishing institutions in the U.S. are college- or university-based. Some of the most well known are MIT, Harvard, Stanford and the University of California. Researchers at these institutions conduct a lot of science research and publish a corresponding number of science-research based papers in peer-reviewed journals.

In this new effort, the research group sought to better understand the factors underlying the tendency of prestigious institutions to produce more published manuscripts than other, less-prestigious institutions.

The work involved sifting data from the Web of Science database, which is actually a portal to several other databases, all of which contain massive amounts of data related to science research efforts. In their effort, the researchers included data from 1.6 million published articles, written by 78,802 authors, all of whom were either tenured or on a tenure track.

The data involved research efforts at 26 U.S. universities that grant Ph.Ds. The researchers focused on data describing productivity of both the authors involved in research efforts and publishing groups as a whole.

The researchers found a pattern—more prestigious schools tend to produce more papers because they have more people available to work on research teams. They noted that neither the senior- nor junior-level people working on the papers were more productive than others working at less-prestigious institutions; it was just more people working and getting more done.

The researchers suggest the possibility that less-prestigious institutions could increase their publication rates if they chose to increase the number of qualified people available to work on research and publishing efforts.

More information: Sam Zhang et al, Labor advantages drive the greater productivity of faculty at elite universities, Science Advances (2022). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abq7056

Journal information: Science Advances

© 2022 Science X Network

Citation: Study shows prestigious institutions produce more published manuscripts because they have a bigger labor pool (2022, November 26) retrieved 26 November 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-11-prestigious-published-manuscripts-bigger-labor.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Regions outside the Randstad want foreign students to stay: Trouw

China’s Henan province, home to the world’s largest iPhone factory, pushes US$7 billion digital infrastructure expansion programme

Giant sea scorpion species discovered in New Mexico

Five healthy digital habits It's not too late to make resolutions that will make your digital life safer and more convenient, say Kaspersky experts

Daol signs MoU with InterOpera

Biden team weighs fully cutting off Huawei from US suppliers

Tyre Nichols' death has reignited the debate around police brutality. Here are 5 proven ways to reduce it - and 2 strategies that don't work.

Northern Lights Glimmer in Manitoba Night Sky

Top Chinese memory chip maker YMTC said to be laying off 10 per cent of workforce after US sanctions

Amid high levels of contamination, Puerto Rico town's residents plead for action

Almost 2k organisations registered with SMS registry that will roll out ‘likely scam’ alerts from Jan 31

Chinese premium EV maker Xpeng brings in Great Wall Motor veteran Wang Fengying in bid for mass-market supremacy

Giving children chickenpox vaccine 'could end risky pox parties'

Chinese e-commerce giant JD.com pulls the plug on Indonesia and Thailand sites in Southeast Asia logistics pivot

Chinese internet search giant Baidu plans to launch a ChatGPT-style bot in March, source says

STYLE Edit: Hublot unveils 2 new meaningful luxury timepieces at LVMH Watch Week 2023 – an update to its debut Classic Fusion Original, and a Big Bang Unico Sorai for rhino conservation

NEWS RELATED

Think twice before sharing your e-mail address

When you browse the Web, an increasing number of sites and apps are asking for a piece of basic information that you probably hand over without hesitation: your e-mail address. It may seem harmless, but when you enter your e-mail, you are sharing a lot more than just that. ...

View more: Think twice before sharing your e-mail address

TikTok’s chief executive to testify before Congress in March

The chief executive of TikTok, Chew Shou Zi, has agreed to testify to Congress in March on the video app’s relationship with the Chinese Communist Party, it was announced Monday. Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Republican of Washington, who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee said that Chew would ...

View more: TikTok’s chief executive to testify before Congress in March

Honda retains lead in motorcycle market

Thai Honda Co, a manufacturer and distributor of Honda motorcycles, has maintained its top rank in Thailand's motorcycle market for the 34th consecutive year, with sales standing at 1.38 million units in 2022. Honda motorcycles were ranked number one in all segments, covering the family, automatic (AT) and sports ...

View more: Honda retains lead in motorcycle market

Head of Australian Antarctic Division to step down

The head of the Australian Antarctic Division has announced his resignation ahead of the finalisation of a review into workplace culture. Kim Ellis, who took up the role in 2019, has announced his retirement, the division said on Tuesday. It is reported Mr Ellis will step down in coming ...

View more: Head of Australian Antarctic Division to step down

STYLE Edit: Meet Lilou Wadoux, Ferrari’s first female Competizioni GT driver with Richard Mille Racing Team, who will ride the Ferrari 488 GTE with the AF Corse team in March

Richard Mille Racing Team protégé Lilou Wadoux is set to become the first female Ferrari Competizioni GT driver at Le Mans. The 21-year-old French woman from Amiens will join the starting grid at the wheel of the Ferrari 488 GTE with the AF Corse team, hoping to make a ...

View more: STYLE Edit: Meet Lilou Wadoux, Ferrari’s first female Competizioni GT driver with Richard Mille Racing Team, who will ride the Ferrari 488 GTE with the AF Corse team in March

ChatGPT-connected companies like BuzzFeed see stock volume surges in enthusiasm over OpenAI

Companies tied to artificial intelligence services recorded some of their highest trading volumes on record this month, amid a frenzy of interest in the ChatGPT tool, which generates conversation-style interactions. BuzzFeed Inc, C3.ai Inc, SoundHound AI Inc, and BigBear.ai Holdings Inc are among the stocks that have all seen ...

View more: ChatGPT-connected companies like BuzzFeed see stock volume surges in enthusiasm over OpenAI

Can you teach a computer common sense?

Dr. Yejin Choi University of Washington Professor and MacArthur Fellow, works to improve AI’s understanding of common sense. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption toggle caption John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation The first time Short Wave co-host Emily Kwong ever “spoke” to a computer ...

View more: Can you teach a computer common sense?

New cancer treatment found ‘promising’ for terminally ill dogs

A new therapy to treat late-stage cancer in dogs can not only extend the lives of canines but also preserve “good quality of life”, according to a new study that may also lead to improved treatments for some cancers that affect humans. The research, published recently in the journal ...

View more: New cancer treatment found ‘promising’ for terminally ill dogs

Cryptocurrency entrepreneur and Huobi adviser Justin Sun plans move to Hong Kong while talking up China market

Tens of thousands of teachers sign up to union in last fortnight to join walkout

Obesity can trigger Alzheimer’s symptoms, new study suggests

Watch distant worlds dance around their sun: Stunning timelapse shows exoplanets orbiting their star 133 light-years away from Earth

A mysterious flying spiral above Hawaiian night sky likely caused by SpaceX launch

Bring back the dodo bird? Ambitious plan draws investors, critics

Glowing material may cut out internal stitches

Xiaomi looks to improve decision-making with new governance bodies in wake of management reshuffles, slumping sales

Mars shines bright in night sky as it vanishes behind moon

Dolphins and humans can team up to go fishing. Scientists now understand why.

EPA blocks mine project that threatened crucial Alaskan salmon runs

Pandemic, culture wars revive 'school choice' policy push

OTHER NEWS