A new disposable paper battery activates with a few drops of water. It seeks to minimize the overall environmental impact in the long run.

Sure, it sounds quite interesting, but does it hold up enough power to run various gadgets? The proof-of-concept study that was published in the Scientific Reports explains its potential real-life uses.

This Disposable Paper Battery Powers Up with Water! Is it Powerful Enough?

(Photo : Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
TOKYO – JANUARY 15: A model introduces Panasonic’s new alkaline battery “EVOLTA” series at Tokyo Midtown on January 15, 2008 in Tokyo, Japan. The new AA alkaline battery sets a Guinness World Record for the longest service life.

Disposable Paper Battery Powers Up with Water

Homes these days have become smarter than ever, and more Internet of Things devices are requiring batteries to work.

Not to mention that as simple as remotes also need to be typically powered by disposable batteries. And in this day and age, almost all electronics have gained a remote, including aircon.

But to be frank, the need for more disposable batteries in our daily lives ends up creating more waste in the long run.

Thankfully, a group of researchers has developed a new form of disposable battery, which is made of paper and gets its power in a few drops of water.

According to a recent report by Sci Tech Daily, the development of the innovative water-powered battery was led by Gustav Nyström, along with his colleagues Xavier Aeby and Alexandre Poulin. And their paper was actually published last July 28.

The science news website notes that the battery is made mostly of paper. The researchers have printed three inks on it. It also includes a single cell, which is around one centimeter big.

It is to note that ink is unlike typical ink we see on documents. Instead, it specifically contains graphite flakes. The study notes that it essentially works as the positive end that all batteries have. On the other hand, the negative part of the battery is printed with ink as well, but it comes with zinc powder.

So it turns out that the print on the paper battery allows it to have both negative and positive ends, making it work like a normal battery.

What’s more, the disposable paper battery features some salts, and it allows it to power up by using a few amounts of water or H2O.

Is it Powerful Enough?

As per the news story by Science Alert, the disposable paper battery is powerful enough to run various “low-power electronics and the Internet of Things ecosystem.”

This Disposable Paper Battery Powers Up with Water! Is it Powerful Enough?

(Photo : CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images)
In this illustration photo taken on July 19, 2022 the Netflix logo is seen on a TV remote in Los Angeles. – Netflix reported losing subscribers for the second quarter in a row Tuesday as the streaming giant battles fierce competition and viewer belt tightening, but the company assured investors of better days ahead. The loss of 970,000 paying customers in the most recent quarter was not as big as expected, and left Netflix with just shy of 221 million subscribers.

The research claims that the battery achieves a stable 1.2 volts. It means this innovative version of disposable batteries is nearly parallel to the AA alkaline batteries that we mostly use, which offer up to 1.5 volts.

Written by Teejay Boris

NEWS RELATED

What reptile's bones can teach us about Earth's perilous past

The lower jaw of Palacrodon provided researchers with information about the reptile’s teeth. Credit: Yale University An extinct reptile’s oddly shaped chompers, fingers, and ear bones may tell us quite a bit about the resilience of life on Earth, according to a new study. In fact, paleontologists at Yale, ...

View more: What reptile's bones can teach us about Earth's perilous past

Strong Geomagnetic Storm Could Produce Atypical Northern Lights as Far South as in the US

(Photo : Pixabay/MartinSr) Strong Geomagnetic Storm Could Produce Atypical Northern Lights as Far South as in the US The Space Weather Forecast Center (SWPC) at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a Geomagnetic Storm Watch for Saturday, October 1. The said geomagnetic storm is said to be moderate but ...

View more: Strong Geomagnetic Storm Could Produce Atypical Northern Lights as Far South as in the US

Ancient 'sharks' appeared much earlier than previously thought

Fanjingshania renovata. Credit: Heming Zhang The first appearance of shark-like ’jawed fish’ may have happened some 15 million years earlier than previously thought, according to new evidence. A handful of fossil teeth from a completely new species, uncovered from rock samples found in China, suggest jawed fish emerged some ...

View more: Ancient 'sharks' appeared much earlier than previously thought

Emergency department crowding hits crisis levels, risking patient safety

In a pair of new studies, Yale researchers document a widespread and increasing level of overcrowding in America’s emergency departments (EDs), a crisis that puts patient safety and access to care at risk. For the studies, the researchers examined, respectively, the progression in recent years of two measures of ED ...

View more: Emergency department crowding hits crisis levels, risking patient safety

NASA James Webb, Hubble Space Telescope Capture Impact of DART Asteroid Impact [LOOK]

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope acquired some images of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft colliding with Dimorphos on Monday earlier this week. In fact, James Webb and Hubble were able to observe the same astronomical object at the same time for the first ...

View more: NASA James Webb, Hubble Space Telescope Capture Impact of DART Asteroid Impact [LOOK]

Scientists Successfully Measure an Exotic Bond for the First Time

The atoms are polarized by the beam of light and start to attract each other. Credit: Harald Ritsch / TU Wien Atoms may be made to attract one another using light. Theoretically, this effect has been predicted for a very long time. However, the Vienna Center for Quantum Science ...

View more: Scientists Successfully Measure an Exotic Bond for the First Time

NASA’s SOFIA telescope just took its last flight

Since its first flight in 2007, NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, otherwise known as SOFIA, has observed the universe from 41,000 feet above the Earth’s surface. Now, the unique space telescope housed in a modified Boeing 747 has taken its last flight. In honor of the flight, NASA ...

View more: NASA’s SOFIA telescope just took its last flight

High Blood Pressure May Accelerate the Aging of Your Bones

Mice that had hypertension had a 24% reduction in bone volume fraction. According to a recent mouse study presented at an American Heart Association convention, high blood pressure may accelerate the aging of bones. According to a recent study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension Scientific Sessions 2022 conference, ...

View more: High Blood Pressure May Accelerate the Aging of Your Bones

Hurricane Ian Pushes Back NASA, SpaceX Crew-5 Astronaut Launch Again to Oct. 5; Artemis I Affected?

New NASA Weather Sensors Capture Vital Data on Hurricane Ian From Space Station

COVID may have pushed a leading seasonal flu strain to extinction

Staring Into Hurricane Ian’s Eye: NASA Scientists Are Analyzing the Forces That Made the Storm So Catastrophic

Florida’s Space Coast on track after Ian, set for 3 launches in 3 days

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Captures Closest View of Jupiter’s Icy Moon Europa in 22 Years

Why Do Some Kids Take Bigger Risks Than Others?

Staggering visualization shows the world’s population at 8 billion

Russian Cosmonauts Undock From Space Station and Return to Earth

People With Glaucoma Are at Significant Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Superager Brains Contain ‘Super Neurons’

Most Twitter users don't follow political elites, researchers suggest

OTHER NEWS

Breaking thailand news, thai news, thailand news Verified News Story Network