Amazon’s Alexa is capable of keeping all your audio recordings, according to a viral TikTok video uploaded by a woman.

Upon requesting all the possible data from her smart home gadget, she was shocked after knowing that the company knows almost everything about her.

TikTok Video Reveals Scary Part of Amazon’s Alexa

tiktok, tiktok viral, amazon alexa, amazon alexa recordings, user data

(Photo : Find Experts at Kilta.com from Unsplash)
A viral TikTok video shows that Amazon could record and save all your audio clips without your permission. The woman reveals the scary part behind the devices.

According to a report by The Independent on Friday, Oct.22, a woman on TikTok found out that Amazon has been keeping a lot of voice data from her device. For context, she has two Amazon Echo Dot speakers and an Echo device for the smart light bulbs.

After receiving the requested data from Amazon, she immediately downloaded the ZIP file inside the folders. She found out that thousands of her short recordings were stored here. The TikTok user described her discovery as “scary.”

   @my.data.not.yours Reply to @ladyisabellemae #privacy #fyp #foryoupage #amazon #alexa #dataprivacy #bigtech #bigbrother #trending #bigdata #privacyrevolution #update  ♬ Spongebob – Dante9k     

Furthermore, the woman explored each file and saw 3,534 clips there. In addition, she mentioned on her TikTok video that she could not recall syncing Amazon Alexa to the “Contacts” file which is a storage of her conversations with other people through her device.

The woman pointed out that Amazon could also possibly know her location. Moreover, she also spotted another mysterious file that tells about the “exact” area where her smart speakers are placed.

What Amazon Says About this Privacy Concern

In line with the TikTok that made rounds online, an Amazon spokesperson said that they grant the users control and transparency when using Alexa, News.com.au reported.

The company representative added that they also have the option to review and delete the short voice clips. They could also choose not to save them any time they want.

In addition, the importing of phone contacts to Amazon’s Alexa is optional according to the spokesperson. The customers are free to disable this feature, as well.

How to Request Data From Amazon

The Independent wrote that there’s a way to ask the company about your recordings and other files. All you need to do is to access the Request My Data page by clicking here. From there, you can now submit a request to the firm about particular information that you want to obtain.

For extra tips, you can erase your short voice clips in the Alexa App. If you are either an Android or iOs user, you can start by going to your phone’s Settings and looking for “Alexa Privacy.”

After that, click the “Manage Your Alexa Data.” Next, you can now remove the recordings automatically. To activate this setting, tap “Off.” By using this trick, you can also identify the duration of your data before you delete them.

A few years ago, an Oregon woman complained that her Amazon Echo Dot recorded her private conversations with her husband without consent. She later found out that it was sent to a random person.

Last week, the Amazon Ring Doorbell was reportedly keeping all the voice recordings of a woman through a phone. The involved woman sued her neighbor who installed the smart home device without her permission.

Written by Joseph Henry

NEWS RELATED

Study shows first record of oceanic anoxic event 1b in Jiuquan Basin section

Section photograph showing boundary (red line) of Xiagou and Zhonggou formations in Hanxiagou section. Credit: NIGPAS The Cretaceous paleo-ocean has experienced multiple phases of Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), characterized by organic carbon enrichment, geochemical indicator anomalies and fossil assemblage changes. It includes three events, namely OAE 1, OAE 2 ...

View more: Study shows first record of oceanic anoxic event 1b in Jiuquan Basin section

Computer Scientists Eliminate Pesky Quantum Computations

For years, intermediate measurements made it hard to quantify the complexity of quantum algorithms. New work establishes that those measurements aren’t necessary after all. Samuel Velasco/Quanta Magazine As quantum computers have become more functional, our understanding of them has remained muddled. Work by a pair of computer scientists has clarified ...

View more: Computer Scientists Eliminate Pesky Quantum Computations

Prying eyes and ears—the impact of Facebook's Project Aria on people's privacy

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain The rapid evolution and spread of digital technology raise various privacy and ethical issues both for those developing technologies and for the public. Some new technology contains small cameras that can be easily disguised in public, with photo and video data that can be recorded, ...

View more: Prying eyes and ears—the impact of Facebook's Project Aria on people's privacy

Nvidia’s RTX 4090 Ti could require a huge amount of power

With Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 40 series reportedly doubling the performance of its predecessor, it shouldn’t be too surprising that either the RTX 4090 or RTX 4090 Ti may require a massive 1,200-watt power supply unit (PSU). Twitter user harukaze5719 made a general tweet regarding Intel’s upcoming Raptor Lake CPUs, ...

View more: Nvidia’s RTX 4090 Ti could require a huge amount of power

Unexpected energy storage capability where water meets metal surfaces

Dr. Mahnaz Azimzadeh Sani and Dr. Julia Linnemann (from right) are part of the team that found unexpectedly high electrochemical capacities on individual gold and platinum nanoparticles. Credit: RUB, Kramer Although interfaces between metals and water are the local areas where crucial processes of energy technologies such as water ...

View more: Unexpected energy storage capability where water meets metal surfaces

Samsung Sticks to Foldables, While Market Data Shows that AR and VR Industry Can Reach $300 Billion in Value in 2024

Samsung is now significantly falling behind when it comes to the race for augmented reality or AR and virtual reality or VR devices to the market. This could be due to the company’s “obsession” with foldable phones. Samsung ‘Obsessed’ with Foldables But Lags in AR and VR Devices As ...

View more: Samsung Sticks to Foldables, While Market Data Shows that AR and VR Industry Can Reach $300 Billion in Value in 2024

Moon Knight Actor Gaspard Ulliel, 37, Dies After Ski Accident

His apparent final performance in Moon Knight will be on Disney+ on March 30. French actor Gaspard Ulliel has died at age 37 after a ski accident. According to Deadline, who reported the news first, Ulliel suffered a head injury that he was unable to recover from despite being transported ...

View more: Moon Knight Actor Gaspard Ulliel, 37, Dies After Ski Accident

We asked, you told us: RCS doesn't stand a chance in the messaging game

Google criticized Apple last week for taking advantage of peer pressure around the iMessage app and the green bubble phenomenon. The company called on Apple to switch to the more modern RCS protocol for Android users in iMessage, as opposed to the archaic SMS standard. Our own Rita El ...

View more: We asked, you told us: RCS doesn't stand a chance in the messaging game

YouTube Will Cut Back on YouTube Originals to Focus on Producing Content for Kids and Minorities

Microsoft’s $60bn Activision Deal Clears $20bn from Sony’s Valuation in a Day

Fish study shows role of estrogens in sense of smell

Penguin takes astounding selfie video of its diving and feeding activity

IoT technology set to help provide safer community housing

Samsung is reportedly lagging behind the competition in the AR/VR space

Scientists identify therapeutic target for Epstein-Barr virus

Razer Blade 17 vs MacBook Pro 16: Which should you buy?

Amazon gives its ‘Lord of the Rings’ series a redundant name

Advanced algorithms plus exceptional X-ray laser reveal structures of not-so-neat-and-tidy materials

Disaster recovery: Are you prepared for the cloud to clear?

We all look at ourselves in Zoom meetings, right? Well, there's a fix for that

OTHER NEWS

;