Hubble sometimes gets a bad rap as being inferior to the new James Webb Space Telescope. But it’s not inferior, they’re just designed to view different things in the cosmos. A spiral galaxy 29 million light-years from Earth showcases their different abilities.

The European Space Agency (ESA) released two views of galaxy IC 5332, found in the Sculptor constellation and at 66 million light-years across is about two-thirds the size of the Milky Way. This galaxy is known for being almost perfectly face-on from Earth’s vantage point, making its symmetrical sweeping arms easy to see.

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

The legendary Hubble telescope, which mostly views visible light and is managed by a partnership between NASA and ESA, shows dark lanes between the dust, allowing the spiral shape to pop against the blackness of space. The Webb telescope, a collaboration of NASA, ESA, and the Canadian Space Agency, was able to detect infrared light waves (a type of light that isn’t visible to our eyes) through that dust, showing a complex star-spangled gas structure, mirroring the same spiral shape. Each arm appears hairier and fibrous, with intricate threadlike features.

The views are different because Webb and Hubble view different types of light, and different stars shine brighter at distinct wavelengths of light. That means scientists can learn a lot about the celestial region from studying both images.

“Ultraviolet and visible light are far more prone to being scattered by interstellar dust than infrared light,” according to ESA. “Therefore dusty regions can be identified easily in the Hubble image as the darker regions that much of the galaxy’s ultraviolet and visible light has not been able to travel through. Those same dusty regions are no longer dark in the Webb image, however, as the mid-infrared light from the galaxy has been able to pass through them.”

Want more science and tech news delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for Mashable’s Top Stories newsletter today.

Webb telescope sees a much hairier spiral galaxy than Hubble

Left: Hubble view of the spiral galaxy IC 5332 Credit: ESA / NASA

Right: Webb view of the spiral galaxy IC 5332 Credit: ESA / NASA / CSA

Observing mid-infrared light is particularly hard from Earth because the atmosphere absorbs much of it and heat from the atmosphere further complicates detecting this light. Hubble, which resides in low-Earth orbit at some 340 miles above the surface, doesn’t get cold enough to pick up such things.


Related Stories


  • Spectacular Webb telescope image shows a stellar death like never before
  • The Webb telescope just took the deepest photo of the universe ever
  • Carina Nebula images from Webb and Hubble telescopes paint stunning views of the universe
  • Webb’s new Neptune images reveal ghostly, stunning rings
  • Webb will observe some of the oldest, faintest light in the universe. The infrared telescope became operational in July 2022.

    It uses a much larger primary mirror and is situated in deep space about 1 million miles from Earth.

    NEWS RELATED

    Collision of prehistoric continents 'cooked' the bones of ancient amphibians, say researchers

    A photograph of the Jarrow amphibian Keraterpeton galvani on top and a CT-image of K. galvani below showing the alteration in the bones. Credit: Dr Aodhan O’Gogain, Trinity College Dublin Scientists have solved a decades-long mystery as to why ancient tetrapods—amphibian-like creatures that lived over 300 million years ago—preserved ...

    View more: Collision of prehistoric continents 'cooked' the bones of ancient amphibians, say researchers

    Coastal diatoms' genetic diversity comes to the rescue when aquatic environments change abruptly

    Slag heaps near Solstad copper mine today. Credit: Helena L Filipsson A closed copper mine on the Baltic Sea coast just south of Västervik has helped researchers study the capacity of coastal diatoms to survive when the environmental conditions change. A thesis from the University of Gothenburg shows that ...

    View more: Coastal diatoms' genetic diversity comes to the rescue when aquatic environments change abruptly

    What Makes Hawaii's Erupting Volcanoes Special

    Lava flows from the Mauna Loa volcano on December 4, 2022 near Hilo, Hawaii. Mauna Loa is the largest active volcano in the world. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Just after Thanksgiving, for the first time in almost 40 years, Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano ...

    View more: What Makes Hawaii's Erupting Volcanoes Special

    Could new cancer drugs come from potatoes and tomatoes?

    Credit: CC0 Public Domain Everyone knows someone who has had cancer. In 2020, around 19 million new cases—and around 10 million deaths—were registered worldwide. Treatments are improving all the time, but can damage healthy cells or have severe side effects that are hard on patients. In the search for ...

    View more: Could new cancer drugs come from potatoes and tomatoes?

    Researchers find an elusive European parent of lager yeast in Ireland

    Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new paper in FEMS Yeast Research reports that, for the first time in Europe, scientists have discovered the ancestor of the yeast species necessary for the production of lager beer. Brewing is one of the oldest human industries. Scientists have uncovered evidence of fermented ...

    View more: Researchers find an elusive European parent of lager yeast in Ireland

    A faster way to preserve privacy online

    New research enables users to search for information without revealing their queries, based on a method that is 30 times faster than comparable prior techniques.

    View more: A faster way to preserve privacy online

    Improving Antibiotic Treatment: Scientists Test “Smart” Red Blood Cells

    An illustration of the new drug delivery system. Credit: Ella Marushchenko The “smart” red blood cells deliver antibiotics that target specific bacteria. A natural delivery system that uses red blood cells as a vehicle to transport powerful antibiotics throughout the body safely has been developed by physicists at McMaster ...

    View more: Improving Antibiotic Treatment: Scientists Test “Smart” Red Blood Cells

    China launches newest solid-fuel carrier rocket Kuaizhou 11 Y-2

    China launches its newest solid-fuel carrier rocket Kuaizhou 11 Y-2 at 09:15 a.m. (BJT), from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, December 7, 2022. /CGTN China launched its newest solid-fuel carrier rocket Kuaizhou 11 Y-2 on Wednesday at 9:15 a.m. (BJT), from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in ...

    View more: China launches newest solid-fuel carrier rocket Kuaizhou 11 Y-2

    Slingshot Aerospace Bags $41 Million Funding — To Be Used for its Space Safety Projects?

    NASA didn’t test one of Orion’s most important systems in first flight

    NASA Will Test its Fast but Quiet Supersonic Aircraft X-59 at Nashville

    JBL Quantum TWS wireless earbuds review: Great earbuds for gamers on the go

    Scientists Discover New Permanent Changes Caused by Giving Birth

    Mynaric, Redwire, BigBear.ai partner for DARPA’s laser communications program

    25 Astronomical Sightings to Watch Out Ahead of Christmas 2022

    New find suggests ankylosaur’s tail clubs were for bashing each other

    Ankylosaurs battled each other as much as they fought off T. rex

    The moon as it looked 50 years ago: Newly-remastered images from humanity's last lunar landing in December 1972 reveal the incredible view of Apollo 17 astronauts

    Severe COVID-19 Linked With Molecular Signatures of Brain Aging

    James Webb telescope breakthrough lets us ‘see’ dark matter

    OTHER NEWS

    Breaking thailand news, thai news, thailand news Verified News Story Network